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Insights about the app design and development ecosystem.

Development Design

JPG, PNG and SVG on the web: A beginner’s guide

Nowadays, images are an indispensable part of the web. However it wasn’t always like that. Only in 1993 the Mosaic browser would introduce images along with content in web pages. Some formats, like GIF and JPEG, already existed in that time and others like PNG and SVG, would only appear in the 90s. Images are used for multiple purposes, like showing pictures, branding, illustrations, charts and many other things.
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Technical Opinion Design

API Design: Think First, Code Later

As a software developer, I know how hard it is to contain the urge to start coding as soon as we can. After the first sprint planning, our fingers – uncontrolled, hungry creatures – want to start smashing the keyboard, translating our ideas into code fastly and furiously.

Despite how great we feel while developing, it’s always a good idea to take a step back, especially when building something that could be used by many different users – like an API is. A. In this post, I’ll show you why and how to design a properly-thought API.

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Technical Design

Exporting UI assets with Sketch: simplifying your workflow

If you’re either a UI designer or a developer, you’ve probably heard of Sketch in the past years – or maybe you’re even using it. Sketch has become a very popular software and broadly used by UI designers. In this article, I’ll show some steps of my workflow when creating and exporting assets to mobile or web applications.

I hope that this article will be useful for designers starting to use Sketch or developers who need to export assets from a Sketch file. If you’re already experienced with Sketch, you’ll probably be familiar with most of the things I’ll be presenting, but you can still get some good insights from this article.

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Technical Opinion Design

The overlap between design and engineering: a different perspective on product development

A common way to describe a product development process is with the DesignFront-endBack-end stack. This approach takes into account the disciplines involved on the process, and though it helps making things understandable, the distinction enforces the idea that the process is linear and phase-dependent.

This linear flow can also be defined as the waterfall model, and it’s rather common in the web industry. All pages are designed upfront, then a set of mockups are handed off to be translated into front-end code, and then, after all of that, the back-end logic is created. This causes an isolation of professionals on each phase, which leads to a series of implementation issues, mostly due to the difficulty of foreseeing all details and use cases on the early stages.

It also leads to the notion that there’s “my work” and “your work”. It’s not rare to hear developers saying: “Designers can’t touch my code!” or designers complaining that “The front-end developer messed up my layout!”. This creates barriers to the process. As obvious as it might sound, everyone is working towards the same goal: building outstanding products. And a more collaborative process is the way to achieve that.

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